Applications of FHX Ultra MTP/MPO Cassettes

Nowadays, data communication technology has developed rapidly. To achieve high speed transmission, it is very common to see complex cabling system in data center, which may even include thousands of fibers. Under such circumstances, saving space in data center is a critical issue. Therefore, fiber optic components or cabling solutions which are characterized by high density will gain the popularity among data center managers. MTP component is such one that can satisfy the requirement. And this article is going to introduce FHX ultra MTP/MPO cassettes and their applications in data center.

Overview of FHX Ultra MTP/MPO Cassettes

MTP/MPO cassette is widely used for high-density cabling in data centers. It is pre-terminated and pre-tested enclosed unit which can provide secure transition between MTP and LC, SC or MTP discrete connectors. And it is usually structured with LC, SC or MTP adapters on the front side of the cassette and MTP adapters at the rear of the cassette. FHX Ultra MTP/MPO cassette has three types: FHX ultra 8F MTP-LC cassette, FHX 12F MTP-LC cassette and FHX MTP conversion module. Here is a figure for you to have a better understanding of these three types of MTP cassettes.

FHX Ultra MTP MPO Cassettes
Applications of FHX Ultra MTP/MPO Cassettes

For application, MTP cassette can be easily found in 10G, 40G and 100G network applications in data center.

FHX Ultra 8F MTP-LC Cassette

Since both FHX ultra 8F MTP-LC cassette and FHX 12F MTP-LC cassette serve to realize the transition from small diameter ribbon cables terminated with MTP connector(s) to the more common LC interfaces used on the transceiver terminal equipment, this part will take FHX ultra 8F MTP-LC cassette as an example. The FHX ultra 8F MTP-LC cassette is structured with four LC duplex (8-fiber) adapters on the front side of the cassette and one 12-fiber MTP adapter at the rear of the cassette, and it is often used for 10G to 40G connection. As the following figure shows, we can also add FHX ultra enclosure and FHX MTP adapter panel to the cabling solution. From the left to the right, four 10G SFP+ transceivers are plugged into four 10G ports on the 10G switch. Then they are connected to LC adapters on the FHX ultra 8F MTP-LC cassette through four LC duplex patch cables. The cassette is installed in the FHX ultra enclosure. One MTP trunk cable connects two MTP adapters respectively on the rear of the cassette and MTP adapter panel. Finally, the 40G QSFP+ transceiver on the 40G switch is connected with MTP adapter on MTP adapter panel through another MTP trunk cable. In this application, 100% fiber utilization is realized. What’s more, the 1U fiber enclosure can house 18 x 8F FHX cassettes or 12 x 12F FHX cassettes, with the total fiber capacity up to 144 fibers for LC interface, greatly saving cabling density.

application of FHX ultra 8F MTP-LC cassette
FHX MTP Conversion Module

The FHX MTP conversion module has several kinds, this part will take 3x MTP-8 to 2x MTP-12 (24-fiber) conversion module as an example. This kind of FHX MTP conversion module is structured with three 8-fiber MTP adapters on the front side of the module and two 12-fiber MTP adapters at the rear of the module. We can use FHX ultra enclosure to hold MTP conversion module. The following figure shows the cabling solution for 120G to 120G connection. Three 40G QSFP+ transceivers are respectively plugged into 40G ports on three 40G switches on both sides. Then the three 40G QSFP+ transceivers are connected with three 8-fiber MTP adapters on the front side of the module through three MTP trunk cables. Finally, two 12-fiber MTP adapters at the rear of two respectively modules are connected through two MTP trunk cables. This cabling solution utilize Based-8 MTP cabling system and achieves 100% fiber utilization. With the use of 1U FHX ultra enclosure, twelve 3x MTP-8 to 2x MTP-12 conversion module can be used in this cabling solution, which creates a 33% spacing-saving upgrading path.

application of FHX MTP conversion module
Conclusion

The FHX ultra MTP/MPO cassettes can not only meet the need for saving space in data center cabling, but also realize 100% fiber utilization during the cabling. With superior best-in-class features, FHX ultra MTP/MPO cassettes can offer you cost-effective, simple 10G to 40G, 40G to 40G, 40G to 100G or 120G to 120G cabling solutions and ensures high performance at the same time.

Deploy 40G/100G in Your Data Center

Due to the massive amount of storage is needed for high bandwidth, the demand for higher capacity of network deployment is rapidly increasing. Obviously, the conservative 2-fiber transmission is not enough to satisfied the need. And 12 or 24-fiber 40/100G Ethernet migration is quickly becoming a hot spot. This article will provide some cabling solutions for 40G/100G cost-effective and simplified migration path in data center.

10G to 40G

Take parallel optical transceiver 40GBASE-SR4 QSFP+ for example, it is structured with 12-fiber MTP connector, so it is used with 12-fiber MTP cable (only eight fibers are used, four for transmit and four for receive). The following figure shows the simplest way for migration from 10G to 40G. We can utilize 40G MTP/MPO breakout cable which has an MTP/MPO connector on one end and four duplex LC connectors on the other end. The MTP/MPO connector end is plugged into the MTP/MPO connector interface of 40GBASE-SR4 QSFP+ transceiver, while the other end is connected with four 10G SFP+ transceivers.

10G to 40G
10G to 100G

As for migration from 10G to 100G, we can utilize 100GBASE-SR10 CFP transceiver and 100G MTP/MPO breakout cable. The 100GBASE-SR10 CFP transceiver is structured with 24-fiber MTP/MPO connector interface. When using with MTP/MPO 24 fiber cable, the 100GBASE-SR10 transceiver only uses twenty fibers, ten for transmit and ten for receive. The following shows that one 100GBASE-SR10 CFP transceiver and ten 10G SFP+ transceivers are connected by MTP breakout cable which has 24-fiber MTP/MPO connector on one end and ten duplex LC connectors on the other end. This is the simplest cabling solution for 10G to 100G connectivity.

10G to 100G
40G to 40G

For 40G to 40G connectivity, we can use 12-fiber MTP trunk cable and MTP/MPO adapter panel to connect two 40GBASE-SR4 QSFP+ transceivers. We know that when deploying MTP link, we have to take polarity into consideration. Here are two cabling solutions for you. The first one uses Type A and Type B MTP trunk cable; the second one only uses Type B MTP trunk cable.

40G to 40G
100G to 100G

For 100G to 100G connectivity, here are three cabling solutions. The first one uses two 24fiber MTP-LC fanout cables, two 12-fiber MTP trunk cables and two MTP adapter panels; the second one uses three 24-fiber MTP trunk cables and two MTP adapter panel; the third one uses two duplex LC patch cables, two MTP cassettes and one 24-fiber MTP trunk cable. However, the third cabling solution does not use 100GBASE-SR10 CFP transceiver. It deploys ten 10G SFP+ transceivers on both sides to achieve 100G to 100G data transmission.

100G to 100G
Conclusion

With the rapid development for data communication, the migration from 10G to 40G or 100G is inevitable. Then how to deploy 40G or 100G in data enter becomes the primary concern. All the transceivers and cabling assemblies presented in 40/100G connectivity solution are available in FS.COM.

Practical Knowledge About MTP Fiber Testing

High density cabling is common in today’s data centers. Characterized by fast installation, high density and high performance cabling, MTP fiber optic cable has become the common cabling solution to satisfy the ever increasing bandwidth requirements of data centers, such as MTP MPO fiber breakout cable, SM MTP trunk cable, MTP conversion cable and so on. We know fiber testing is a key step to ensure the high performance of the network deployment. However, with complicated structure, MTP fiber testing is not an easy job. This article share some practical knowledge about MTP fiber testing.

MTP fiber optic cable

Challenges of MTP Fiber Testing

Challenge 1. MTP fiber optic cable is pre-terminated fiber whose quality can be only guaranteed as it exists in the manufacturer’s factory. Out of the factory, it must be transported, stored, and later bent and pulled during installation in the data center. There are all kinds of performance uncertainties before deployment. Proper testing of pre-terminated cables before installation is the only way to guarantee performance in a live application.

Challenge 2. MTP fiber optic cable has polarity. The simple purpose of any polarity scheme is to provide a continuous connection from the link’s transmitter to the link’s receiver. For MTP/MPO apc connector, TIA-568-C.0 defines three methods to accomplish this: Methods A, B and C. It is common to make deployment mistakes because these methods require a combination of patch cords with different polarity types.

Challenge 3. Migration from 10G to 40G and 100G is common. Though this migration strategy is an efficient way to leverage the existing cabling, in comparison to 10G connection, the 40G and 100G standards call for different optical technology (parallel optics) and tighter loss parameters. In all, it is necessary to verify the links to ensure that the performance level achieves the requirement of the network deployment.

Proper MTP Fiber Testing

The proper MTP fiber testing is simple and quick enough, typically under 10 seconds per fiber. Test all 12 fibers—the whole cable—simultaneously and comprehensively (including loss, polarity). That sort of test capability changes the fiber landscape, enabling installers and technicians to efficiently validate and troubleshoot fiber—flying through the process by tackling an entire MPO 12 cable with the push of a button.

The tools used to carry out the test are available on the market, such as Metal Texture-400X Desktop Video Three-dimensional Microscope, Optical Power Meter, Optical Light Source and so on. These tools promise to save testing time and labor costs up to 95% over individual fiber tests.

Conclusion

The increasing demand for higher density cabling and data transmission rate is driving network technology to evolve at an ever increasing pace. To get high performance of network deployment, fiber testing cannot be ignored. As MTP fiber optic cable has been widely deployed, MTP fiber testing is an important step before installation. I hope after reading this article, you can learn more about MTP fiber testing.

A Closer Look at 40G QSFP+ SR4 Transceiver

As 40G network has been widely applied in today’s data center cabling system, 40G QSFP+ transceivers gain great popularity among data center managers. And for short data transmission distance, 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver is preferred. This article is going to focus on 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver and share several cabling solutions for 40G QSFP+ SR4 with you.

Overview of 40G QSFP+ SR4 Transceiver

40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver is a parallel fiber optic transceiver which means it uses four fibers for transmitting and four fibers for receiving at the same time. Designed with MTP/MPO interface, 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver is used together with multimode fiber, such as OM3 and OM4. Working on wavelength of 850 nm, 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver can support 40G fiber optic transmission with the link length up to 100 meters over OM3 fiber and 150 meters over OM4 fiber. For application, 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver can be used for 10G to 40G and 40G to 40G connections. Here is a figure of 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver for you.

40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver

10G to 40G Connection

Since 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver uses four independent full-duplex transmit and receiver channels, the 40G optical signal can be split into four 10G optic signals. Therefore, we can increase the fiber count at the 10G distribution end to realize 10G to 40G connection. As the following figure shows, we can use 12f MPO trunk cable and fiber enclosure. Four 10G SFP+ SR transceivers are inserted into 10G ports on one side, while one 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver is inserted into 40G port on the other side. Then the four 10G SFP+ SR transceivers are connected with four duplex LC patch cables which are plugged into LC ports on the front side of MPO fiber cassette inside the fiber enclosure, and the 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver is connected with 12f MPO trunk cable which is plugged into MTP/MPO port on the rear of MPO fiber cassette. Finally, the whole optical link is completed.

40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver for 10G to 40G connectionA

We can also use MPO to LC fanout and MTP fiber patch enclosure which includes MTP fiber adapter panels. This cabling solution is similar to the previous one, but the difference is that the four 10G SFP+ SR transceivers are connected with MPO to LC fanout which is plugged into MTP/MPO port on the MTP fiber patch enclosure. The scenario is shown in the following figure.

40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver for 10G to 40G connectionB

40G to 40G Connection

The following figure shows the simplest scenario for 40G to 40G connection. Two 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceivers are separately inserted into two 40G switches. Then the two 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceivers are connected by 12f MPO trunk cable.

40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver for 40G to 40G connectionA

We can also use MTP fiber patch enclosure to achieve better cable management and higher density cabling. The scenario is shown in the following figure. With the use of MTP fiber enclosure, cable management for 40G to 40G connection could be easier. A 48-port 1U rack mount MTP fiber patch enclosure includes up to four 12-port MTP fiber adapter panels with MPO MTP fiber optical adapters on it, here is a figure for you.

40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver for 40G to 40G connectionB

Conclusion

Designed with parallel transmission mode, 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver has a wide range of cabling applications with great flexibility. The cabling solutions mentioned above are just several commonly used ones. As for detailed cabling solutions for 40QSFP+ SR4 transceiver, it is suggested to depend on the practical applications and cabling environments. I hope after reading this article, you can learn more about 40G QSFP+ SR4 transceiver.

Applications of MTP Conversion Cable

We know that MTP/MPO cable is a great option for nowadays data center fiber optic cabling which needs higher and higher cabling density and transmission capability. In most cases, 12-fiber MTP cable is used to realize 10G to 40G or 40G to 40G connection. However, there is a problem in this cabling system—only eight fibers of the 12-fiber MTP cable are used (four fibers for transmitting and four fibers for receiving), leaving the middle four fibers unused. That means using 12-fiber MTP cable cannot achieve 100% fiber utilization. To solve this problem, MTP conversion cable is available on the market. And this article is going to introduce applications of MTP conversion cable in data center.

1×3 MTP Conversion Cable

This type of MTP conversion cable is usually used for 40G to 120G connection. It is terminated with one 24-fiber MTP connector on one end and three 8-fiber MTP connectors on the other end. As shown in the following figure, a 120G CXP transceiver is plugged into the 100G CFP interface on the switch on the one side, while three 40G QSFP+ transceivers are plugged into the 40G QSFP+ interfaces on the switch on the other side. Then the 1×3 MTP conversion cable connects the 120G CXP transceiver with the three 40G QSFP+ transceivers—the 24-fiber MTP connector terminated at the cable is directly plugged into the CXP transceiver, while the three 8-fiber MTP connectors are plugged into the three QSFP+ transceivers. In this way, 40G to 100G migration can be realized smoothly.

40G to 120G connection with 1x3 MTP conversion cable

2×3 MTP Conversion Cable

This type of MTP conversion cable can be used for 10G to 40G or 40G to 40G connection. It is structured with two 12-fiber MTP connectors on one end and three 8-fiber MTP connectors on the other end. For 10G to 40G connection, MTP fiber optic cassette is also needed. As shown in the following figure, three 40G QSFP+ transceivers are plugged into the 40G QSFP+ interface on the switch on the one side, while twelve 10G SFP+ transceivers are plugged into the 10G SFP+ interfaces on the switch on the other side. Then the three 8-fiber MTP connectors terminated at 2×3 MTP conversion cable are directly plugged into the three 40G QSFP+ transceivers, while the two 12-fiber MTP connectors are plugged into the MTP 12 fiber adapters mounted at the rear of the MTP fiber optic cassette. With one end of twelve duplex LC patch cables plugged into the LC adapters on the front side of the cassette and the other end of the twelve cables plugged into twelve 10G SFP+ transceiver, the 10G to 40G connection is accomplished.

10G to 40G connection with 2x3 MTP conversion cable

For 40G to 40G connection, we can use a MTP adapter panel. From the figure below, we can find that the connections on both sides are symmetrical. The three 8-fiber MTP connectors at the end of 2×3 MTP conversion cable are directly plugged into the three 40G QSFP+ transceivers, then into 40G QSFP+ interfaces on the switch. And the two 12-fiber MTP connectors of both two MTP conversion cables are plugged into MTP 12 fiber adapters on the MTP adapter panel.

40G to 40G connection with 2x3 MTP conversion cable

Conclusion

It is not difficult to find that the three cabling solutions above make use of all the fibers. Therefore, data center managers can gain great value to utilize MTP conversion cable which can achieve 100% fiber utilization as well as meet the demand for high density cabling. FS.COM provides high quality 1×2, 1×3 and 2×3 MTP conversion cable at low price.

Decoding Outer Jacket of MTP/MPO Cable

As high density cabling system has been widely deployed, MTP/MPO cable can be easily found in network deployment. But when you buy MTP/MPO cable in the online store, you must have been encountered with the situation where you not only have to select single-mode or multimode, 12 fibers or 24 fibers, but also have to consider the outer jacket of the cable which can protect the cable from damage. According to different cabling environment, there are different types of outer jackets, among which CMP, LSZH, CMR, CM are mostly used. How much do you know about them? This article will decode outer jacket of MTP/MPO cable and I hope it will be helpful for you when buying MTP/MPO cable.

MPO cabling

CMP

CMP (plenum-rated) cable complies the IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) 60332-1 flammability standard. It has passed stringent burn testing and is suitable for installation into air plenum spaces, where environmental air is transported. Typical plenum spaces are between the structural ceiling and the drop ceiling or under a raised floor. CMP cable is designed to restrict flame propagation no more than five feet as well as limit the amount of smoke emitted during the fire. In spite of this, for safety reason, any high-voltage equipment is not allowed in plenum space because the fresh air can greatly increase the danger of rapid flame spreading if the equipment is on fire. Because it has high fire-retardant, it usually costs more than other types.

LSZH

The LSZH (low smoke zero halogen, also refers to LSOH or LS0H or LSFH or OHLS) has no exact IEC code equivalent. The LSZH cable is based on the compliance of IEC 60754 and IEC 61034. It is the newest in a family of ratings and it is sometimes refereed to as low toxicity cable. Containing no halogen type compounds that forms these toxic substances, LSZH cable gives of very little smoke and does not produce a dangerous gas/acid combination when exposed to flame. LSZH cable is suitable to be used in place where air circulation is poor such as aircraft, rail cars or ships. However, it is less fire-retardant than CMP.

CMR And CM

CMR (riser-rated) complies IEC 60332-3 standards. CMR cable is designed to prevent fires from spreading floor to floor in vertical installations. It can be used when cables need to be run between floors through risers or vertical shafts. CM (in-wall rated) cable is a general purpose type, which is used in cases where the fire code does not place any restrictions on cable type. Some examples are home or office environments for CPU to monitor connections.

Conclusion

To select a suitable MTP/MPO cable for your network deployment, it is necessary to learn about the relevant details of cable ratings, which is as important as other factors. As a professional MTP patch cable supplier, FS.COM provides high quality plenum and LSZH MTP/MPO patch cord at affordable prices.

Three Cabling Solutions for 40G Network

Network technology has been developed rapidly and many data centers are utilizing 40G network to satisfy their needs for high density cabling and high speed data transmission. When it comes to 40G network cabling solutions, MPO fiber optic cable assemblies are most used by data center managers. This article is going to introduce three cabling solutions for 40G network—cabling with no conversion component, cabling with conversion module and cabling with conversion harness.

Cabling With No Conversion Component

For cabling with no conversion component solution, in fact, it is a Base-12 MTP connectivity solution. The 12-fiber MTP trunk cables are deployed in the whole 40G connectivity. But in this cabling solution, four fibers are not used. Apart from this, there will be additional cost associated with the purchase of additional fibers. Though this solution does notuse 33% of the installed fiber and may require more cable raceway congestion, it does have the advantage of simplicity and lowest link attenuation.

Cabling With Conversion Module

With the use of conversion module MPO patch panel, the unused fibers can be converted into usable fiber links. For every two 12-fiber MTP connectors in the backbone cable, we can create three 8-fiber links. Using Base-12 connectivity and Base-8 connectivity together realizes 100% fiber utilization. When reusing existing deployed MTP cabling, great value will be gained if using conversion module to use all previously deployed fibers, and we can eliminate the cost of having to deploy additional cabling.

canling with conversion module to convert two 12-fiber links into three 8-fiber links

Cabling With Conversion Harness

The cabling with conversion harness solution uses standard MPO patch panel and 2×3 MPO conversion harness. It can achieve full fiber utilization. Although it seems attractive, it involves considerable cabling challenges. For instance, if you only need two 40G connections to the equipment, what do you do with the third 8-fiber MTP connection? Or what if the 40G ports are in different chassis blades or completely different chassis switches? The result will be long assemblies, which will be difficult to manage in an organized way. For this reason, this kind of solution is expected to be the least desirable and so the least deployed method.

cabling with conversion harness to convert two 12-fiber links into three 8-fiber links

Which One to Choose?

If you are installing new cabling, then you can consider cabling with no conversion component solution, assuming that the cable raceway is not a concern. If you are using previously installed MTP trunks, cabling with conversion module solution is recommended which can realize 100% fiber utilization while maintaining any port to any port patching. The cabling with conversion harness solution is typically deployed only in specific applications, such as at the ToR switch, where 40G ports are in a close cluster and patching between blades in a chassis switch is not required.

Conclusion

It is not difficult to find that each type of cabling solution has their own advantages and disadvantages. As for which on to choose, it all depends on your specific network deployment environment and requirements. After reading the content above, I hope you can have a better understanding of these three cabling solutions for 40G network and choose a suitable cabling solution for your network deployment.

Practical Knowledge About Base-8 and Base-12

MTP system is now popular among data center managers, because it can provide high-density cabling while saving time. Base-8 and Base-12 are two most used cabling solutions and both them have their own advantages. For example, Base-8 can realize 100% cable utilization while Base-12 can provide higher fiber count for cabling. As both Base-8 and Base-12 play an important role on the basis of MTP system, some network designers may ask “will one cabling solution fit all applications? Or can I deploy Base-8 and Base-12 together to combine their advantages?”. This article aims to share the practical knowledge about Base-8 and Base-12, and you will find the answer after reading this article.

No One Cabling Solution Can Fit All Applications

We know that Base-12 makes use of fiber optical links based on increments of 12 fibers and 12-fiber MTP fiber optic connector is common used. However, there is a problem when using Base-12 cabling solution—four fibers for transmit and four fibers for receive, leaving four fibers unused per connection. While Base-8 can be a more cost-effective option for end-to-end MPO to MPO channels and architectures. Deploying Base-8 connectivity in duplex architectures for 10GBASE-SR and 25GBASE-SR will save 4% to 5% for data center managers, but if you are running groups of 6-ports, Base-8 may result in a significant cost increase. Generally speaking, no one cabling solution can fit all applications. In fact, in some cases, Base-12 may still be more cost-effective.

Deploy Base-8 and Base-12 Together: Yes or No?

Since Base-8 or Base-12 are not universal solutions, it seems that the best choice for data center managers is to deploy Base-8 and Base-12 together in the same data centers. Can we do that? The answer of the question depends. If directly mix the components and plug a Base-8 MPO MTP cable into a 12-fiber module, then the answer is “No”. Base-8 components and Base-12 components are not designed to be plugged directly into each other. Generally, Base-12 MTP trunk cable has unpinned (female) MTP connectors on both ends and demands the use of pinned (male) breakout modules. While the Base-8 MTP trunk cable is manufactured with pinned connectors on both ends. So plugging a Base-8 trunk cable into a Base-12 breakout module will definitely not work. However, Base-8 and Base-12 can be used in the same data center, but they should be maintained independently. As they are not interchangeable, some care is needed when managing the data center physical layer infrastructure, to ensure Base-8 and Base-12 components are not mixed within the same link.

Deploy Base-8 and Base-12 Together Yes or No

Conclusion

From the content above, we can get that there is no one cabling solution fitting all network applications. To make full use of the advantages of Base-8 and Base-12, they can be used in different applications according to different requirements. For the most commonly 10G to 40G migration, Base-8 would be a strong consideration over Base-12. Although Base-8 and Base-12 are not interchangeable, but they can be used in the same data center as long as the links are maintained separately.

MTP Connectivity — Low-loss Multifiber Connectivity

It is not difficult to understand that MTP connectivity is widely applied in 40G and 100G network applications because it is a multifiber connectivity, which can meet the demand for high-density cabling. As a matter of fact, there is another key advantage of MTP connectivity, that is low-loss. With the length and type of the fiber cable, number of connectors and splices all contributing to the link loss, there is no doubt that insertion loss is inevitable during the cabling process. Therefore, cabling solution with low-loss will be preferred by data center managers, who are now regarding optical insertion loss budgets as one of the top concerns. But what contributes to low-loss in MTP connectivity? This post will show you the answer.

Low-loss Connector

Typical MPO/MTP fiber connector, which is used for 40 and 100 GbE deployments, has insertion loss values that range from 0.3 dB to 0.5 dB. In addition, MPO/MTP connector is structured with MT ferrule which has low insertion loss and can provide accurate fiber alignment. Take 12 fiber MPO connector and 24 fiber MPO connector for example, with low-loss ferrules, the insertion loss of both two type of connectors can be rated at 0.35 dB maximum. Reading this, you may ask shouldn’t the result be that higher fiber count will lead to higher insertion loss? The answer is no. Because when using proper polishing techniques, 24-fiber MPO/MTP terminations can meet the same performance levels as 12-fiber MPO/MTP assemblies.

Low-loss Cable

We know that OM3 and OM4 fibers used in MTP connectivity utilize 850 nm source, and IEEE 40GBASE-SR4 and 100GBASE-SR10 standards for 40 and 100 GbE over multimode fiber have more stringent loss requirements for these two types of fibers, which lowers the overall channel loss. As shown in the following table, as speeds have increased from 1 Gb/s to 40 and 100 Gb/s, maximum channel distance and loss has decreased significantly. For OM3 fiber cabling, the 40 and 100 GbE standards allows for a channel distance of 100 meters with a maximum channel loss of 1.9 dB, including a maximum connector loss of 1.5 dB; for OM4 fiber cabling, the distance is increased to 150 meters but with a maximum channel loss of 1.5 dB, including a maximum connector loss of 1.0 dB.

channel loss of OM3 and OM4 fibers

Note: Current TIA and ISO standards require a minimum of OM3 fiber, while TIA recommends the use of OM4 due to its longer transmission capabilities. In fact, the 100GBASE-SR4 standard that uses eight fibers (four for transmitting and four for receiving) at 25 Gb/s is anticipated to be supported by OM4 fiber to 100 meters, but to only 70 meters using OM3.

Conclusion

In today’s large virtualized server environments with high speed 40 and 100 gigabit Ethernet (GbE) backbone switch-to-switch deployments for networking and storage area networks (SANs), staying within the loss budget is essential for ensuring that optical data signals can be properly transmitted from one switch to another without high bit error rates and performance degradation. MTP connectivity, based on low-loss MPO/MTP connector, OM3 and OM4 fibers, is able to reduce the insertion loss to a minimum, which makes this low-loss multifiber connectivity take its place on the market.

Originally published at http://www.china-cable-suppliers.com/mtp-connectivity-low-loss-multifiber-connectivity.html

Focus on MTP-link

Characterized by providing ideal plug-and-play solutions for structure cabling, pre-terminated cabling system has gained great popularity among data center manager in recent years, and it is considered as the norm for data center network deployment. In this cabling system, optical link is accomplished by pre-terminated cabling assemblies, such as MTP/MPO trunk cable, MTP/MPO to LC breakout cable, MTP/MPO cassette and MTP/MPO fiber optic patch panel. It not difficult to find that all these MTP/MPO fiber optic cable assemblies are based on the structure of MTP/MPO connector. And two types of MTP/MPO connectors—12 fiber MTP connector and 24 fiber MTP connector are commonly used for 40G and 100G transmission. This article will focus on MTP-link and share share some opinions about MTP-link performance with you.

12-fiber MTP connector vs. 24-fiber MTP connector

About Space Utilization

High-density cabling makes the available space in data centers always precious. MTP/MPO fiber optic cable assemblies used in MTP-link that contributes to promoting space utilization are reputably appraised by data center managers. With massive cables being adopted in the data centers to carry out data transmission, MTP-link offers cabling solutions with much higher density and flexibility for data center upgrades.

About Insertion Loss

As well know that insertion loss is inevitable during the cabling. Generally, lower overall optical loss allows more margin for the network to operate, or in the case for some users, offers the option of more connections for patching locations. Therefore, components characterized by low insertion loss will be preferred. For both 12-fiber and 24-fiber MTP/MPO connector performance, the industry standard product rating is 0.5 dB maximum. And using low-loss ferrules, both 12 fiber MPO connector and 24 fiber MPO connector can be rated at 0.35 dB maximum. What’s more, there is no need to worry about higher fiber count will lead to higher insertion loss, because when using proper polishing techniques, 24-fiber MPO/MTP terminations can meet the same performance levels as 12-fiber MPO/MTP assemblies.

About Fiber Utilization

Both 12-fiber MPO cable and 24-fiber MPO cable can be used in 100G applications. When used in 4x25G solutions, 4 fibers of 12-fiber MPO cable will remain unused. As for 24-fiber MPO cable, it can be converted into three 8-fiber 100G channels that run over one cable, with all 24 fibers used to support data transmission. Maybe you feel confused about this, let me take an example. If you need to support twelve 100G channels with the 4x25G standard, by using 12-fiber MPO cable, you will need to install 12 connectors, or 144 fibers total, with 33% of the fiber wasted; while by using 24-fiber MPO cable supporting the same 12 channels, only 4 cables would be required, using 96 fibers total, at 100% fiber utilization.

About Network Performance

It is self-evident that MTP-link offers consistent high levels of network performance for improved network integrity, because the assemblies are factory terminated and the transmission testing is performed by the manufacturer before shipment. This will reduce the likelihood of many problems that may occur with field terminations. Also, testing and troubleshooting time can be greatly saved.

Conclusion

By using MTP components, MTP-link can provide fast installation, high density and high performance cabling for data centers. As 40G and 100G Ethernet is now a trend and hotspot for data center cabling system, MTP-link is a great option for data center managers and the network deployment will benefit a lot from this cabling solution. I hope after reading this article, you can have an in-depth understanding of MTP-link.